Ancestry.com Review

I decided to see if I could trace my family’s roots. Growing up my brother and sister and I had always heard stories about the family tree, but we only got bits and pieces of information. Unfortunately both of my parents have passed away, but I am sure if the internet was around when they were, our family would have been armed with quite a bit more information about our ancestors. When I found Ancestry.com while I was surfing the web I was intrigued. I had tried free online genealogy sites, but discovered that you could only get so far before a charge was involved. I couldn’t wait to do an Ancestry review to find out if it was right for me.

What I like About Ancestry.com

When I first signed up for a membership I really liked that fact that the site offered a 14 day free trial. All too often, I have paid for things that did not turn out to be very useful. I figured 14 days was enough time to see if they could do what they promised.

What really impressed me about Ancestry.com was the fact that the company has spent over 10 years building their resources. That was really apparent when I started building my tree. I was thrilled that I was given hints. The site will tell let you know if other family trees may have the information that you are looking for. They will also give you a hint if there are census records, death, marriage and birth certificates, or relevant articles or photos. I discovered that my mother’s side of the family comes from Norwegian royalty.

The customer service is fantastic. If you have a question they will get back to you very quickly. Another great feature on the site is the Ancestry Anne column. She is real pro and a big help to a newbie like me. Ask her a question, and you might even be featured on her blog. The historians, who work for the site, also have live streaming videos so you can grow your family tree. I really like the phone app as I can take my history with me, and do not have to lug around my laptop.

The Most Valuable Thing About Ancestry.com

A huge feature on the site is the free research guides. Not only can you look for your ancestor’s war history, but you can also find your families immigration information. I was able to find my Dad in the World War Two guide, and am in the process of trying to discover if my great, great, great Uncle was the General Winfield Scott that we used to read about in history class. If you have always wondered if there were outlaws or unscrupulous members of your family, you can check out the Shady Characters guide which is quite interesting. I haven’t had much luck finding out if there were any brothel owners or bootleggers in my family. If you do your own Ancestry Review perhaps you can.

The Family History 101 section is awesome. Not only do they have articles where you can get tips and tricks for building your tree, but you can also take online classes. Ancestry.com has great Facebook and Twitter pages where you can connect with other tree growers. 101 will even show you how to put the pieces together. It’s great to find out who your relatives were, but it is even better when you discover the stories behind their lives.

What I Don’t Like About Ancestry.com

So far I haven’t found anything that I do not like about Ancestry.com. If I had to share one dislike, it would be wishing they had arrived 20 years ago. The only other thing that I really don’t like about the website is that it is addicting. Once you start, you cannot stop. The tools that are available are phenomenal. Once your branches start to grow there is no stopping them. Some of my branches are broken, but I’m finding new growth on my tree and have been able to repair some of them.

Ancestry Review

I would recommend Ancestry.com to anyone who is curious about their family history. It is always nice to find out why you do the things you do, who you really are, and what makes you tick. I know now that my new-found royal blood may be one of the reasons that I like to be waited on hand and foot. I never would have known had I not done an Ancestry Review.

Check out Ancestry.com for yourself here: Ancestry.com.